Executive Summary

I had a thought today that I would like to know the answer to. With so much publicized research being done on the properties of breast milk (antimicrobial, stem cell properties, brain development and so on), where is the research into real lactation problems? Where is the safe approved drug to increase milk supply (Metclopramide isn’t really ‘safe’ and Domperidone isn’t really ‘approved’), where are the actual diagnoses for supply problems? Maybe companies would rather head toward synthesizing the properties of breast milk rather than helping to fix bodies to produce it. After all it’s only several hundred thousand women a year, and formula does exist (my tongue is so far into my cheek it might poke through…)

I don’t know. I suspect there is not a satisfactory answer.

So I leave you with this. A short guide to various posts that are intended to be helpful.

I need help:

How to interview a Lactation Consultant

11 things a Lactation Consultant should know how to do (IMO).

Do I need help?

I find my tongue tie resources out of date, though you can see my experience here. For better information I would urge joining this Facebook group. They maintain lists of providers and are fairly knowledgeable about what is to be expected. If a provider is not on their list people can often recommend local alternatives (for instance I know of at least 4 laser tongue tie release places in New Zealand now, but none has made the general list. Do see the New Zealand Tongue Tie resources page instead.)

I need to combination feed-how do I do this?

The big fat Combo feeding FAQ

Walking the line

Benefits of

With low supply

SNS tutorial

Nipple confusion

Managing long term

Formula

Solids

Weaning

Body Image

What is causing this?

Able

Potential causes

Birth complications

Rare vs Undiagnosed

My most popular post

Making Milk beads

And the rest of my life.

I think I no longer feel bad, because it isn’t something I did wrong. It’s purely a medical issue.  A medical issue that some people would have me believe is my fault. A medical issue I cannot get satisfactory treatment for and that is largely undiagnosed. That makes me mad.

I lie. I still feel bad and somewhat inadequate, but I no longer feel guilt. I do wonder how much of my feeling bad is a normal level for someone suddenly faced with a non-life threatening failure of a body part. Somehow I can’t imagine people feel a mix of loss of gender identity and self loathing after losing a kidney or having a splenectomy. Or losing a finger or a limb. I’m sure there are other mixed feelings but I wonder how often self hatred/loathing/failure is a part of that.

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Let’s talk formula

Because someone needs to.  So here it is from me- someone who wanted to breastfeed and supports breastfeeding where reasonable, yet used and uses formula for medical reasons. Maybe that makes me a mostly neutral party. Maybe not.

First off- everything I learned about formula is self-taught or I learned from a Lactation Consultant. A good LC, on seeing that you want or need to use formula should be able to give you some pointers. Theoretically all formulas should be pretty much the same, brand name or budget. The WHO is supposed to regulate the ingredients and basic proportions. However-sometimes things are not so straightforward.

What you want out of a formula is to have it be whey based. Not casein based. You want the from birth formula. The follow-ons  marketed from age 6 months + are not as well regulated and unnecessary (though they are often cheaper…). If your child requires supplementation beyond 1 year, full fat cow milk can be given (or mixed with formula if you are concerned about diet or intake).

Cow milk is recommended because growing brains need fat. If your child does not like cow milk to drink (mine didn’t), just be sure to supplement with other high fat foods alone or in cooking. Food such as- avocado, cheese, coconut oil or cream, peanut or seed butters, butter, cream, lamb, olive oils, and so on. For extra calcium try various vegetables like kale, alfalfa, etc and fish like sardines, salmon etc.

Back to formulas. Whey or milk solids should be the first ingredient. Maltodextrin is a common additive and should be around the 3rd-5th ingredient. It is sometimes seen as the first ingredient- this is not necessary and may make your baby eat more- its a carbohydrate that is digested quickly.

If you are combination feeding you do not need any special formula. Any birth to 12 month one that suits you is fine.

This sort of thing

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Image credit

Is straight up predatory marketing. I was always ambivalent about formula companies being big and bad and preying on the breastfeeding mother, but yeah. Not after seeing that. I’m pretty sure people are eating it up too. I’d hate to be more cynical but I’d imagine that if the one on the left cost more people would be paying for that too.

Let me reiterate: You do not need anything special to combination feed. No formula is better than any other. In fact less is often more.

Some reading on safe formula use can be found here http://info.babymilkaction.org/infant_feeding/formulafeeding

Take 2: When you think you know what to do and are so very wrong.

Now that we have put the SNS away at home, a little earlier than with the first kid, I should get what I learned from my difficult second child down somewhere.
Well I say difficult, but she was difficult only because of my milk supply issues.
She developed very minor jaundice early on. Not enough to worry anyone but enough to get really really sleepy.

By 6+ days old we had to institute a waking and feeding schedule and we had to continue waking her for feeds until well over 2 months of age. Yay baby sleep you might think. Yes, on one hand this was nice because my first did not sleep and instead ate all the time. Sleep also makes it possible to do hard things. Like lots of pumping. But with low supply you do want an eager baby stimulating your supply. So every 3 hours I had to wake her up and then came the 1-2 hour long ordeal of keeping her awake through feeds just in time for the next feed to start. Every 3 hours 24 hours a day. Blargh. Wet cloths, undressing, blowing in her face, and even icepacks on her feet. And because she was so sleepy and not able to get enough from me part of this routine came to involve force-feeding with a bottle. She came to hate the bottle. In fact she hated anything not a breast in her mouth. Maybe having her tongue tie and upper lip tie lasered at 3.5 weeks oversensitized her but she developed into an orally particular baby.

As I knew how to use the supplemental nursing system I was eager to do that rather than bottles, but she became quite particular about the tube in her mouth. The medium tube which had a faster flow was not acceptable and occasioned screaming if it even touched her. The small tube was never fast enough initially (not that she seemed to care…) and often feeds would take over an hour to complete (even into her 4th+ month). Instead of latching her with the tube near her upper lip I started sliding it into the corner of her mouth around 7-8 weeks and that was the only thing that would work. If she detected it she would fight to get it out, preferring plain breast but of course that wasn’t an option. She developed aversions to one breast and for a while even one position because of association with the tube and I had to exclusively use it on the other one.
She made feeding my first look easy. Sure with number one I had low supply and I was learning as I went but after working out the initial technical problems and difficulty it became routine and predictable. Not so this time. Things were always irregular and a struggle if not an outright fight. I was tracking her intake, output and weight gain until nearly 7 months, where I pretty much stopped the tracking with my first by 3-4 months as things were so routine. The part that bothered me most was that she could not be trusted to self regulate with milk. she would stop and if we let her do that she would not gain appropriately so there were minimum intake volumes she had to meet. This often required waking her up and trying to get more milk into her. So it was a chore.

Things that helped with this difficult baby?

  • Primarily putting the tube in the corner of her mouth. Here is a short and not very good video.

She so very much hated the texture of the tube that putting the tube against her upper lip lost us some breastfeeding positions for a while as she came to associate them with tubes in her mouth. The latch wasn’t great but it was hard to fight about drinking and fight about latch. Especially when she preferred to slip down.

  • Using the NG (naso gastric) feeding tube in a bottle. I was at the point where she would not feed in several positions, would not take the Medela SNS tubing the ‘right’ way and would not take a bottle and I thought I would have to finger feed her or start syringing milk into her mouth. Its a very frustrating position when you want and need help but you know that you know more about alternative feeding methods than any professional you might ask for help. I got one of these NG tubes-which by the way is fairly stiff and inflexible- and stuck it in the corner of her mouth…and away she went. It wasn’t bothering her.

So I then learned how to sneak the SNS tubes into the corner of her mouth. The SNS medium tube is far more flexible than the NG tubing but not nearly as thin and flexible as the small SNS tubing (case in point I have been through multiple small tubes as they develop pinholes just from regular use. At least 2 per child. I have not had to replace the medium SNS tubing through 2 children, but then I don’t use it every day either). But I learned to stick both of them in the corner of her mouth. And things worked. Mostly. Sure feeds took 20 minutes for ~60ml supplement on a good day (and 40-60 minutes on a not good feed- keep in mind this is after 10-20 minutes of regular breastfeeding). And the tube would wiggle and it would need a lot of adjusting (this is why I was happy I had the Medela SNS because when liquid is being consumed you can see air bubbles. Not possible with NG tube in a bottle method), but it worked. But maaaan was I glad to put it away.  No excitement that I was finally meeting her needs (+solids), just relief to be done with such a tedious fussy feeding regime. She’s been fine with plain breast. Which was part of the problem, as that is what she preferred and was not an option because of my supply.

Lesson learned. Never think you know what you are doing.

Deficient.

I do often wonder if there is something mentally wrong with me for doing this mixed feeding malarkey. In my cynical moments I see myself as a mother willing to risk starving her child out of stubbornness. At this point I know my breasts do not lactate appropriately. There is no tricking, hoping or stimulation that is going to make that not be the case. I don’t think formula is that bad or I’d maybe motivate myself to get some donor milk. Despite that I am now citrus, tomato, brassica, onion, garlic, pulse, and gluten free to keep my baby reasonably happy. Yeah if you’d told me ever that I would be on a restricted diet feeding a baby through a tube I would have thought you were crazy. But here I am. Anyhow. But at some level I can not let go of breast feeding and go completely over to the bottle and formula. Now that we are at the point where it isn’t complete hell to mix feed (seems to be 12 weeks is the magic hump) I seriously wonder what is wrong with me.

I see mothers blithely (so I imagine though I’m certain the reality included tears) say that they stopped breastfeeding due to low supply and I wonder why not me? Since this method is definitely not the standard way of dealing with low supply I do wonder of those that have low supply how many would like to be educated about management option and how many prefer to stop outright.

Last time I persevered because it was a giant fuck you, a because-I-can to everyone who told me I couldn’t. This time, in light of a tricky, overly sleepy baby who is not easy to feed and is orally particular, I wonder why I am so stubborn and dangerous.

I do know that once solids are established my feeding rig will be packed away and things will be…normal. Is that reason enough though? To deal with 6-7 months of difficulty for another year of unfettered breastfeeding before I have to encourage weaning and do it all again?

It’s certainly been harder with two. The mixed feeding takes more time than a healthy breastfeeding relationship so the older child misses out. We had planned three children when we were being logical (before kids) but the idea of doing this feeding regimen again is depressing at minimum. The only thing that makes me consider doing this mixed feeding thing again is that we can self wean. The perks of being the youngest.

Why a correct diagnosis is important.

Or how wait and see doesn’t cut it.

For the first 8 months of my first child’s life I thought I had low supply, probably from insufficient glandular tissue. I wanted a definitive diagnosis though and couldn’t find anyone to give me one. Then around 8 months, after we’d transitioned to just solids and breastfeeding and put the SNS away in the closet I noticed something that led me to believe that a posterior tongue tie might be the real problem. I couldn’t get a diagnosis for that either, but the more I read and researched a tongue tie did seem to be present. That discovery filled me with hope. Hope that next time would be different, that there was something I could do to make things better. So I planned my next breastfeeding experience around that. I lined up tongue tie release, made my midwife aware of my history and suspicions and mostly did as I was told- to wait and see because this time things might be different. I was told different child, different mouth shape, maybe no problems this time. I was dubious, and didn’t use as my midwife anyone who refused to take my concerns seriously, but I did get some variation of wait and see from everyone I talked to.

Just to hedge my bets I drank various teas throughout my pregnancy and made all my postpartum meals full of lactogenic ingredients.

And then I had my second baby, not how I planned, in fact things went in a way I hadn’t thought to plan for, but I had her and it was ok. Not great, not bad, but ok. And there was an obvious tongue tie, not a posterior one, and there was some waffling about whether it would cause problems from the hospital lactation consultants, and my midwife went to bat for me and we got it snipped anyhow. It made the latch a bit better and things were going normally. We were proceeding with caution, and I was getting some varying opinions on whether intake was good. Some people said looks good, some people were concerned about swallow frequency. I was a little stressed out, but I was assured that if I hadn’t had any history that no one would be worried. I was cautiously optimistic. Things were already different and better by leaps and bounds in terms of latching and output and weight loss.

After 5 days we went home. My milk came in, though there wasn’t engorgement as such, just a feeling of fullness and heaviness. I wasn’t too worried. After all some women don’t have much engorgement, right? Yes, but. Be concerned when you keep running into signs and symptoms that by themselves don’t mean much but when accumulated paint a more dire picture.

We’d had 8% weight loss by day 6. Well within normal ranges. Considering last time we’d had 11%+ by day 5 and more after that, 8% was fantastic. Output was good, my optimism was increasing. There was still concern about swallow frequency, but things seemed to be going well.

By day 11 only 60g (2oz) had been gained. Normal newborn weight gain should be at least 30g/day. I’d been expressing milk on top of feeding to boost my supply and to give as top ups to combat the cluster feeding. My midwife wanted me to get more than 2 hours sleep per day to help my milk, and also because having a toddler and a newborn isn’t sustainable on 2 hours of sleep out of 24.

The baby was sleeping more and more. We were feeding on demand, but where #1 had screamed and cried and never slept unless held, this one would sleep for 4+ hours, fall asleep at the breast and was generally very lethargic. I was pumping 4-6 times per day on top of feeds, and giving that milk via the SNS. Output was still good.

And day 15 came and the weight was the same as at day 11, 210g below birth weight. And the baby was so lethargic at that point that getting her to take a bottle was over a 1 hour affair of cold cloths, stripping, changes and so on for 60ml consumed.

So now we went into disaster management mode. I was to give 60-100ml via bottle every 3 hours day and night and pump afterward. We practically have to force feed the baby at this point.

It’s been a few days of that and hopefully birth weight will be regained in another day or two and we can revisit other feeding options, or even go back to feeding on demand.

And that’s where we are now. I wish we’d known before that IGT was the issue. I wish I’d been able to get that diagnosis. I could have been using the SNS from around day 10 or before and doing test weights to measure intake rather than disaster management of a lethargic and dehydrated baby.

Now I’ll likely have to contend with nipple confusion, breast refusal and possibly losing any kind of breastfeeding relationship. I might still be able to pull this situation out of the fire, but a diagnosis last time would have made this easier.

 

The Big Fat Combofeeding FAQ

I see a lot of people combination feeding (combining both formula and breast milk in various ways) either out of necessity or desire. Many professionals either disregard the impact this practice can have on one’s supply of breast milk, or believe that combination feeding is unworkable. Many people who start combination feeding without proper knowledge may find themselves stopping breastfeeding prematurely. I had a lot of questions when I started so here are the questions I see asked most often and some answers.

Why combination feed?

  • Work

Perhaps you have a job where pumping is not an option, either due to social considerations, the nature of the work, or simply that you are unable to pump  enough to feed your baby while you are apart.

  • Supply

If you suffer from a low supply or milk transfer issues you may wish to breastfeed but be unable to do so exclusively.

  • Preference

You may prefer to have a family member do one or more feeds per day via a bottle.

Is combination feeding hard?

Yes it can be. Depending on when and how you start, as well as your personal biology and situation, it can also be a good alternative to stopping breastfeeding completely.

How do I do it?

  • Frequency

How often does my baby need formula? This is something that will depend on your circumstances and why you are combination feeding. If you are doing it for work or other separation from baby then you should feed your baby as normal when you are together and have a caretaker feed them as much as they would like during the day. If you are combination feeding due to low supply then you need to figure out how much milk your baby can get from you and offer the balance. There are calculations for this, but I did it by breastfeeding first and allowing my daughter to take as much as she wanted via at breast supplementer.

  • Amount
Breastfed babies often take smaller volumes than fully formula fed babies. The average breastfed stomach volume is 2.5oz to 6oz. Don’t worry if your combination fed baby is not taking a full 5-9oz. This is normal. The entire time my daughter was combination fed her usual volume intake per session was 3.5oz, or around 100ml.
  • Supply

How do I keep my supply? The best way I’ve found to do this is to have rules about combination feeding. You need rules because you are beating back biology. Producing breast milk is a resource heavy process. This is why it burns 20+ calories per ounce/30ml. So your body would naturally prefer to not burn those calories and store them for later. You need to challenge your supply to some extent. A one off break in routine (you are ill and need sleep so you do not breastfeed the baby at the normal time) will not ruin your method, but a consistent pattern of breaking your rules will erode your supply (I’m too busy/tired etc to maintain my rules). This is especially important early on (before 3-6 weeks) before your supply stabilizes. My maxim for this is formula feed on a schedule and breastfeed on demand.

  • Method

How you combination feed will depend on a few factors. Why you are combination feeding, the age of the child when you start, and your schedule.

If you are combination feeding for low supply or milk transfer issues and your child is not very old I highly recommend trying an at breast supplementer.

If your child is older (6 weeks +) and you have supply issues and the latch is fine then you may have better success with a bottle. Of the people I know who have combination fed long term using bottles they started after 6 weeks. If using a bottle I recommend using teat that most replicates your personal let down. Many people find a slow flow teat to do the trick, but if you have a fast let down (not usual in low supply), you may find a slightly faster teat works better for you. I don’t know if any of the specialty teats marketed as breastflow or otherwise will help with nipple confusion. We used a newborn flow (single hole) Avent teat for home and daycare until 12 months.

If you are combination feeding due to work or other separation from baby or preference you may find bottles or cups more appropriate for your situation.

  • What’s the best formula for combination feeding?

Short answer-there isn’t one.

Long answer-The WHO (World Health Organization) mandates that all commercially available baby formulas have similar ingredient lists. Not to say they are all the same. There are variations. The best way to see which is right for you is to give your child 2 weeks on it. If after 2 weeks (or you are experiencing some other major issue) it is not working, feel free to try another brand. I know that’s not very helpful. Sorry. Some formulas have more protein, some have more iron. What you do want, especially if your baby is under 6 months old,  is a whey based formula. The casein based formulas are not suitable for younger babies. Things like hungry baby milk have a higher proportion of casein than whey as it’s more difficult to digest. Here are some articles on that: Gut floraChoosing a formula #1, Choosing a formula #2

  • Is there some kind of magical breast milk formula balance?
No there isn’t. Any amount you can give will be beneficial. Formula doesn’t do any ‘cancelling out’ of the benefits of continuing to receive breastmilk. You may be interested in reading about the benefits of combination feeding.

Personal considerations Your biology

A sensitivity of a woman’s supply is highly variable. Some women can miss a pumping session or feed and find their supply tanking almost immediately. Others stop breastfeeding completely and still leak milk weeks down the line. You’ll need to determine through observation where on that continuum you lie. Generally though, you will not see significant changes in under 3 days. That means, that after your supply is established it will take 3 days of dropping a feed for your body to get the hint and slow down production. This also means that it can take 3 days to see an increase. This is not necessarily applicable during the early stages. Before 3-6 weeks milk supplies are much more variable. Small things like pumping in addition to feeding can cause your supply to increase, and skipping feeds early on can cause your supply to dry up very quickly. Engorgement will also slow down your milk production. The fuller your breasts are the slower you produce milk. A consistent pattern of engorgement will decrease your supply during that time frame. You will need to tailor your combination feeding plan to work with your body.

Poop- what is normal?

Considering one of the main ways we communicate with our babies is observing poop this is a pretty important consideration.

There seem to be fair number of resources on what normal breastfed poop is like and what normal formula fed poop is like, but what about a baby receiving both?

  • Appearance:

This is very dependent on what your formula looks like (as poop) and how much your baby has.

For example, my baby was on three different formulas. Formula #1, which my baby was on from 2 weeks to 2-3 months was a probiotic formula. This formula started off coming out as yellow, but eventually progressed to coming out green. The consistency started off as loose and semi-solid and progressed to being more like modeling clay. The second formula was used in various emergency situations and not regularly. The color was yellow, the consistency semi firm, similar to paste. The Third formula was used from 2-3 months until no longer needed. The color was yellow and the consistency was like mashed potatoes.

  • Frequency:

A breastfed baby, after several weeks of age, may poop as infrequently as once every 10+ days. A formula fed baby may need treatment for constipation if poop is less frequent than every three days. A combination fed baby may fall somewhere in the middle. I found mine would go daily, or more, at first but by several months of age had progressed to every 3-5 days. No one could answer my questions about how frequently my baby should be pooping so we were treating her for constipation with diluted fruit juices and sugar water. After pushing a bit more some of my health care professionals decided that since she was not in pain during the bowel movements, the consistency was not hard or pellet like that the 3-5+ days was fine.

So I’ll pass that on. As long as the consistency is not hard or pelletlike, the child is not in pain from pooping and is not unduly uncomfortable from not pooping then it is not a major concern. This is also dependent, in my opinion, on how much formula your child is receiving on a daily basis. The less formula, the longer you may wait between bowel movements, more then less. My child was receiving 300-400ml (12-14oz) of formula daily, so about 1/2 her expected intake.

Update: In response to a some search engine hits I get I’ll expand on this to cover the other end of the spectrum. Breastfed babies, instead of not pooing, can also poo upwards of 10 times a day. And this is normal as well. If your combination fed baby is pooing frequently there is unlikely to be any cause for concern. Normal breastfed baby poo is fairly liquidy, seedy and yellowish.  What is not normal even for the combination fed infant is dark poo (after the meconium has all passed), ongoing greenish poo that may be frothy, excessive mucus (again, this may be expected around teething), and of course blood. Green poo is  ok for a few days as it can be a sign of illness, and is also normal after vaccinations and if you are giving a probiotic formula. The other ones may merit a doctor visit.

Important things to consider

  • The importance of establishing your supply.

The first 2-3 weeks are important for your development of prolactin receptors. It’s very important to feed on demand during these times so that you will have an adequate supply later on. After 2-4 months your supply stabilizes, your breasts soften and milk production becomes less hormonally controlled and instead based on what is removed. The amount of prolactin receptors you created early on can help you maintain your supply long term.

  • Breast milk is use it or lose it

As mentioned earlier breast milk is a system with high production costs. If your baby isn’t using it (emptying the breast) your body will make less. Your body is lazy and wants to do as little work as possible.

  • Your baby is a person too and may not cooperate with best laid plans!

Your baby may decide they don’t care for the at breast supplementer, or like the bottle, or don’t like the bottle or any number of other things. Or you know, maybe they just aren’t that into breastfeeding as they get older. Early on when we were using bottles and breast my child went through some breast refusal which is what prompted me to swap to an at breast supplementer. Then when she went to daycare at 4 month she had to be retrained to take bottles. Now at 14+ months she will not take a bottle from me.

  • How your baby can help

Consider this if you find yourself losing your supply: if your baby increased your supply once they can do it again. Sure it means clusterfeeding, but it can come back up.

Managing being away from baby

  • Pump or no pump?

To pump or not to pump will depend on several factors. How touchy your supply is should be one of them. However, you may be combination feeding because you cannot or do not want to pump during the time you are away. While dealing with low supply I pumped at least n or n-1, where n is the number of feeds my baby would have had, times during the day when I was apart from my baby. I managed between 30-50ml per session from both breasts combined. I was away from my baby from 8am until 5pm+. From 4-6 months I pumped 3x per day (10am, 12pm, 2pm), from 6-8 months I pumped 2x per day(10am, 2pm) and from 9-11 months I pumped 1x per day (12pm). At 11 months I stopped pumping during the day and fed from the breast when at home. During this period my first day home was full of frequent feedings as my daughter increased my supply again.

If you are unable to pump you may find some benefit in hand expressing during bathroom breaks. This will continue to stimulate your milk production and help prevent blocked ducts and mastitis.

  • The 5 day work week

I had a part time job so I only had a 3 day work week. For those with a 5 day work week (or longer) you will find that by midweek your supplies are decreasing. If you are pumping add an extra session later in the week. You will also want to encourage you baby to eat from the breast as much as possible at the weekend, or on other not work days to maintain your supply. It may go without saying, but I’ll say it anyhow, but the longer you can give your baby time to establish breastfeeding the easier it will be to maintain when back at work, whether pumping or not.

Nipple confusion and flow preference

Nipple confusion is thought to be most prevalent the younger the baby is.  From reading I’ve done it has a few other factors as well including how good the latch is (if bottle milk is vastly easier than breast milk for the infant to obtain then bottle milk will be preferred) as well as the milk flow from the teat. I’ve mentioned it previously, but many people find a slower flow teat helps preserve the breastfeeding relationship. I find that whatever is closest to your let down (slow or fast) will keep the confusion to a minimum. The times when you are most likely to see issues with swapping between breast and bottle are any of the growth spurts (10 days, 3 weeks, 6 weeks, 12 weeks, 4 months, etc), although the 6 week one is the worst. The other one where people doing breast and bottle are likely to hit issues is around 4-5 months. This is an incredibly fussy time with teething, sleep regression and similar and if breastfeeding is not well established as both a comfort and food activity then babies may not be willing to expend the effort to continue. This outlines some details on nipple confusion and how to prevent it.

  • Momma vs not-the-momma

Babies will form different rules for different people. They may expect only breastfeeding from their mothers, and refuse a bottle, but happily take a bottle from another family member or caretaker. I found that preserving our breastfeeding relationship depended early on on how my baby knew to get food from me. Because I had to start so early I had to be very strict with what rules we followed so that we could continue breastfeeding. After we started using the at breast supplementer I did not give my baby bottles. She had bottles from dad and bottles at daycare but mom=boob. If you do want them to take bottles from the breastfeeder I recommend waiting until after 6-8 weeks to introduce them, and certainly by 8-9 months.

What’s the deal with growth spurts? 

This is a new subsection in response again to search engine hits. So what do you do with a combination fed baby having a growth spurt? Be aware that typical growth spurt ages are 7-10 days, 3 weeks, 6 weeks, 3 months, 4 months, 6 months, 9 months and 12 months. This is on average. You may miss or not notice one, or have an extra one (we had an additional one at 9-10 weeks).  During this time babies are unsettled and may want to eat frequently either for comfort or out of hunger. I found during these times that it wasn’t strictly necessary to increase the amount of formula, but it was necessary to give smaller more frequent feedings. As our typical supplementation pattern was 7am, 12pm, 4pm, 7pm, (with breastfeeding sessions at those times and also at 10am, 2pm and several times overnight), during growth spurts breastfeeding became more constant between 9am and 11 am, and also between 1pm and 3pm. At times I split the 12 pm supplementation into two sessions, with smaller amounts at 11am and 1pm.  Do be aware that this is temporary and your baby will be fussy.  Try to stick to your schedule and plan and get through it. Growth spurts and teething are times when your combination fed baby will be more likely to refuse the breast.

Other tips:

If you can, avoid mixing expressed breast and formula milks. Why? Because if your baby doesn’t drink all the breast milk you can re-refrigerate it and reuse it at the next feed and you can’t do the same with mixed or straight formula milk.

SNS tutorial

Just a video tutorial I made. I’ve been using this thing several times every day for over 6 months so I’ve had practice. It’s a bit alarming having my boobies on the internet (when I’m not even sure I like having my photo on the internet), but I’d like to help people, and if this does, so be it.

 

Let’s expand on what I’m doing. Sorry, these posts often get written during nap times or during breaks at work, so I may go back and add things in. I try to have them complete as I send them out, but sometimes I just want them posted, like this video.

With the gravity driven system of the SNS having the tube in the middle of the top lip helps to limit the flow. With non-gravity driven systems like the tube-in-a-bottle a la Jack Newman, or the LactAid, side insertion may be more appropriate.

Other tips and tricks:

You can clamp the tubing (just pinch between fingers like kinking a hose as I show briefly in the video) periodically to simulate space between let downs.

Latching is done per normal, just need to make sure the tube gets in there as well. I found it helpful to bring the nipple up from below the mouth, hook the tubing into the mouth then bring the nipple back down past the nose (to get a wide open mouth) and shove it all in. Here is an ok video of latching with the SNS, though I feel she has too much tube past her nipple.

If you are experiencing sore nipples, don’t try to mix taping up your breasts with Lansinoh or other breast ointment. You’ll lose your tape to the ointment.

Experiment with water or formula before using your breast milk. Just so you know how to stop leaks, put the device on etc.

I always cleaned mine out as soon as I was done using it and had it ready for next time.

Don’t be afraid to experiment with different tubing sizes (SNS) or different bag/bottle heights with any system.